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Common questions about keratoconus

No, it doesn’t. But causes a sudden decline or loss of part of the vision in one or both eyes. Complete blindness is rare.
The disease develops gradually. Leaving untreated may eventually cause loss of part of the vision in one or both eyes
One long-term study in the United States indicated a diagnosis of approximately 1 in 2,000 individuals.
It may stop over the age of 40, but not always.
Keratoconus generally begins in the mid-30s.
Keratoconus may stabilize over 40.
The keratoconus continues to develop and the condition increases from low to medium and severe. Many factors can cause keratoconus, such as Down syndrome, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, Leber congenital amaurosis, Eye injury (especially from too much eye rubbing or contact lens use).
No. But Cross-linking for keratoconus as the treatment works by combining ultraviolet light used in the laser process with riboflavin drops.
Keratoconus can make you tired or need to sleep.
Yes. In many cases associated with pain and headache.
Not always, but occasionally.
No. However, it may be a disability for those who work in sensitive work or driving and vehicles.
The continuity of the progress of the keratoconus varies from person to person and some may stop over the age of 40 and may continue beyond that.
It may cause eye pain, but not always.
No, it doesn’t. Treatments help improve vision and stop the progression of the disease
No, it doesn’t cause keratoconus.
Yes, may help but when becomes increasingly more irregular in shape no longer provide adequate vision correction. Ilajak Medical has the latest diagnostic techniques and technology for visual correction, ophthalmology, and diagnosis with experienced doctors.
Some health conditions are linked to this disorder and may help to cause it. This includes Down syndrome, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, Leber congenital amaurosis, Eye injury (especially from too much eye rubbing or contact lens use).
Keratoconus can cause myopia (nearsightedness) with very high irregular astigmatism. This means distorting the light when it enters your eyes. As a result, the images appear blurry.
Keratoconus doesn’t cause glaucoma, but some keratoconus treatments may have complications, including glaucoma.
Don't cause it directly, but blurring the vision can cause vertigo.
No. keratoconus causes a sudden loss of part of the vision in one or both eyes. Complete blindness is rare.
No, but treatments are used to stop the progression of Keratoconus and to improve vision.
Operations can correct mild-moderate refractive error, and intraocular lenses can correct from low to high refractive error associated with Keratoconus. 
Yes, headache is a possible symptom caused by keratoconus.
No, but causes a sudden decline or loss of part of the vision in one or both eyes. Complete blindness is rare.
It can be managed to stop the condition’s progress. Minor conditions can be treated with medical glasses or contact lenses. In severe conditions are treated by different operations depending on the medical conditions.
It is caused by the intense disruption of Descemet's membrane in the setting of corneal ectasia. Hydrops is a term used to denote an abnormal accumulation of fluid in a body cavity or tissue. Acute corneal hydrops occurs in approximately 3% of patients with Keratoconus.